Colorful stack of books in library

Risk of Tip Over Injuries

At schools, day care centers, and summer camps, there may be a risks to children that may not be well identified by the administrators, owners, and employees.   The Consumer Products Safety Commission reports that over 260 children have died since 2000 due to furniture including but not limited to bookshelfs, dressers, and televisions tipping over on the children.  Another alarming statistics include the report that over 11,000 children suffered personal injuries from tip over related incidents during this time period as well.   The truth is that these injuries are quite foreseeable and preventable.  

One common risk that has been identified is the scenario in which a television – whether flat screen or standard – is placed on top of a dresser or bookcase.   Without proper support and anchoring, the television can be prone to tipping over along with the furniture itself.  This can happen from a person casually bumping into the area or child who lacks good safety judgment pull or pushing on the television or furniture.   As stated, these personal injuries can be avoided with proper anchoring.  Ideally, the facility has a trained maintenance person who can install the anchors in a secure manner.  If there is no such person employed at the day care center or school, a professional should be called in to take care of these most important safety measures.  It should be noted that improperly installed anchors may only be slightly better (if at all) than no anchors at all in protecting the children under the supervision of the day care center or school.   If a television, furniture, or other item cannot be securely anchored, then the best and most prudent measure to take is to get rid of this item from the day care center.   You can read more about this topic at Anchoring Televisions and Furniture Can Prevent Tip Over Injuries to Children. 
Let’s explore a potential incident that could take place at a day care center. Let’s say a 3 year old is watching television in one of the classrooms.  There are a total of 5 children in the room.  While the child care provider is changing a diaper nearby, the 3 year old approaches the dresser and television set and pushed the dresser.  As a result of the push, the television falls on the child and causes the child to suffer a brain injury.   A 3 year old clearly lacks the safety judgment to refrain from such a dangerous act.   If it can be shown that the incident was avoidable with just a minimal effort and expense, then there could be a case or claim pursued on behalf of the injured child.  One factor that is also considered with these potential cases is the type and available of liability insurance.  Because of the complexities of the legal cases and all of the twists and turns of the law and insurance, it makes sense to seek out the guidance and counsel of a Florida Child Injury Lawyer for potential legal representation.
If a child is injured due to the negligence of another person or entity like a day care center, community center, neighbor / friend,  school, or summer camp, a parent should seek out legal advice to find out the course of action that may be taken to recover damages including medical bills, lost wages of the parent, and pain and suffering of the injured child.   The book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know – has chapters on Homeowner’s Insurance, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

Happy little girl looking at camera while swinging on playground area

Playground Injuries

During the summer months and the rest of the year, children enjoy the fun and adventure of spending time on a playground.  Whether it is at the day care center, school, summer camp, or public park, a playground can provide hours of entertainment and activity for children – especially toddlers and pre-schools. Of course, elementary aged children also enjoy going to the playground but as they grow older – the playground loses some of its luster to these children.   For the children who still love to go to the playground, there is great fun but also a risk of injury any time that a child spends time on a playground.

During the summer months, a child can get injured on a playground in a number of ways. One such way is being burned by the hot ground or hot playground equipment.  While a playground owner / operator / supervision cannot do much about the weather, safety precautions can be taken on the playground itself by making the sure that the equipment is made with materials and coating that protects the children and that the ground cover is made of materials that also protect the children in a reasonable manner. 
When a child is enrolled in a summer camp, day care center, school, or other program, child care providers, supervisors, and counselors should first inspect the playground equipment to make sure that it is safe for use by the children. If the playground equipment is so hot that it can burn a child, then the equipment should be some how cooled down or otherwise kept off limits to the children.  Inspections and safety are absolutely necessary for the protection of small children who do not always understand or appreciate the dangers that are out there including those dangers on a playground.   The United States Product Safety Commission recommends the following:
* Watch out for danger of injury from concrete and asphalt ground surfaces;
* Inspect plastic surfaces – especially ones darker in color which attract more heat;
* Inspect and monitor all plastic, rubber,  and metal areas which may contact the child’s body / skin including swings     
  and slides; and
* Beware of any uncoated or worn surface areas of playground equipment.
When a child comes home from a day of adventure on a playground, a child should come home with a smile on his or her face with stories of great fun.  Certainly, a child should not return home with severe personal injuries because the playground equipment was not properly inspected by the child care providers. 
If a child is injured due to the negligence of another person or entity like a day care center, community center, neighbor / friend,  school, or summer camp, a parent should seek out legal advice to find out the course of action that may be taken to recover damages including medical bills, lost wages of the parent, and pain and suffering of the injured child.   The book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know – has chapters on Homeowner’s Insurance, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

Laundry BottleWhile children are under the care of parents, relatives, neighbors, friends, day care centers, schools, or summer camps, there are some common household items, poisons, and cleaners that pose a significant risk of injury to children.   Let’s take laundry detergent pods.   It has been reported that over 30 children per day get into liquid laundry packets or pods.  Keep in mind that children especially toddles and infants are curious.  The bright colors of a laundry pod or packet (to a child) seems like a fun object to play with and even put in the mouth to play with or eat.  Many such laundry pods seem like a big soft piece of candy or like a soft toy to play with.  Of course, the purpose of these laundry pods or packets are to clean clothes and not to serve as a toy or play item.   This goes the same for other common household or day care items like bleach, bug spray, industrial cleaners, etc. . . . It is also well known that children are wonderful and mischievous explorers and adventurers. In other words, children get into places where they do not belong because there is a certain challenge and thrill in getting into places where they should not be in.
As for the laundry packets, the United States Product Safety Commission reports that children can become quite ill from the ingestion or contact with the packets including but not limited to difficulty breathing, loss of consciousness, difficulty breathing, severe eye burns, and vision loss.   That’s right, these bright colored detergent pods and packets are quite dangerous.
Here are some safety tips that should be followed by all child care providers:
* Keep laundry pods / packets, bleach, and other dangerous household items out of the reach of children;
* Place these items in cabinets that are higher than the child’s reach that close and lock;
* Keep all janitor closets, chemical closets, etc. . . securely locked so that children cannot go in;
* To the extent possible, keep all poisons in child resistant caps and original packaging; and
*  Educate all staff members / family members of the importance of keeping these items out of the reach of children.
You can read more about the issues and dangers associated with laundry packets / pods at Emerging Health Risk: Every Day More than 30 Children Get into Liquid Laundry Packets.
If a child is injured due to the negligence of another person or entity like a day care center, school, or summer camp, a parent should seek out legal advice to find out the course of action that may be taken to recover damages including medical bills, lost wages of the parent, and pain and suffering of the injured child.   The book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know – has chapters on Homeowner’s Insurance, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury

close-up of colorful rubber ducks at the pool side (shallow depth of field)

Swimming Pool Drowning      Risks to Children

Even though the risks are well known or should be well known to all adults, some how children including but not limited to toddlers drown every year at private pools, community pools, day care centers, and water parks.  Even one child, who drowns as a result of a preventable incident, is one child too many.  There are many reasons out there for this ongoing problem during the summer months and other times of the year.  It is important to spot the problems and put preventative measures in place to prevent any further drowning incidents.

Supervision
Supervision is a very broad term. Let’s first discuss what actions do not necessarily equate to supervision.   A group of children are swimming in a private pool. The children range in ages from 4 years old to 7 years old.  The swimming ability and experience of each child is quite varied.  There are two adults in the area of the pool.  Does this amount to supervision?  Well, more facts are needed to determine if supervision was truly in place.  If the two adults are both entrenched in conversation while also texting and Facebooking the whole time while the children are in the pool, then – under these facts – one would question whether there was any supervision in place for the children.  If the parents were at full attention keeping their eyes on the children and all parts of the pool without distraction, then this would be supervision.  Many public pools have lifeguards.  Some do not.  Even with lifeguards in place, parents and other adult supervisors should still keep a close eye of their children. 
Life Jackets versus Toys and Blow Up Rafts
For young and inexperienced swimmers, parents and child care providers should consider the use of a life jacket.  This is quite different from floats, water wings, and blow up rafts. While these other items may be somewhat helpful, they do not quite compare to a properly fitting life jacket.
CPR Training
Even with supervision in place, incidents can happen.  Minutes and even seconds matter. It is important that at least one of the adult supervisors or child care providers is trained in CPR so that quick action can be taken.
Fencing, Enclosures, and Alarms
During planned swim times, parents and child care providers can put the proper supervision in place to help prevent drowning incidents from taking place. However, children often go into swimming pool and aquatic areas without proper adult supervision because children will seek out adventures even when they should not.   A swimming pool or water area is commonly referred to as an attractive nuisance.  It is an area that is somewhat enticing to a child who fails to recognize or process the dangers of the activity.  Because of this, it is vital that fencing, enclosures, and when appropriate alarms are placed in and around the swimming pool or water area to prevent children from heading into these dangerous – attractive nuisance areas. 
All of the above safety measures and more can help prevent a drowning incident; however, all the safety measures in the world will not mean much to a parent who is now dealing with an aftermath of a drowning or near drowning incident.   A parent may be able to pursue a claim or case on behalf of the injured child if the lack or insufficiency of the safety measures above caused or significantly contributed causing the drowning or near drowning incident. 
A drowning incident case or near drowning incident case can be established by the following elements:
1. Duty;
2. Breach of Duty;
3. Causation; and
4. Damages
In the State of Florida, the fault or comparative fault of the child (if 6 years of age or older) can be considered.  There may also be blame on others.   Because of the complexity of Florida law and the analysis of drowning related cases, it is important for parents to contact a Florida Child Injury Lawyer for advice, consultation, guidance, and legal representation.
The book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know – has chapters on Swimming Pool and Water Park Injuries, School Injuries, Playground Injuries, and other topics.  You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury. 

 Highway ViewSince people began driving automobiles, there have always been a problem with distracted driving.  Now that virtually every driver out there owns a mobile phone or has access to one, distracted driving is even more prevalent if there is any mobile phone use during the driver.   That’s right, any mobile phone usage.  Whether it is a quick check of a text message or a telephone call, mobile phones take a driver’s eyes, ears, and / or mind off the primary task and responsibility of driving.   It is estimated that in 2012, there were over 3,000 who died as a result of automobile accidents caused by distracted driving.  Another disturbing figure involves the number of people suffering personal injuries as a result of distracted driving. In 2012, over 420,000 people suffered personal injuries as a result of distracted driving.  Most such accidents are avoidable and preventable.   Children, as drivers or passengers, are often injured due to the negligence, fault, and / or distracted driving of another person.  Here are some types of distracted driving:
* Mobile Phone Use (talking – conversation);
* Text Messaging;
* E-Mail, Text or Web Browsing;
* Reading a book, newspaper, or other print item;
* Reaching for or searching for an object in the vehicle;
* Writing a note;
*  Watching a video;
*  Changing the radio station; and
*  Inputing or reviewing information on navigation system or GPS.
The truth is that none of the above activities are needed to properly and safety operate a motor vehicle.  What these activities all have in common is that they all serve as distractions for drivers out on the road.   Of course, there is no need to prove that a driver was distracted if the driver was at fault for the accident.  For instance, let’s say a driver rear ends the driver / vehicle in front of him.  The other driver was stopped at a red light on a clear, sunny day. There is no excuse for crashing into the stopped driver / vehicle.  As such, there is no need per se to prove that the at-fault driver was distracted at the time of the accident or crash.   
When a child is injured as a result of an automobile accident, bicycle accident, or pedestrian accident, a parent is often faced with many issues and challenges.  A Florida Child Injury Lawyer can help a parent get through the many issues and challenges that arise including medical bills, medical treatment, insurance claims, compensation, and other matters.  The book titled – When the Wheels Stop Spinning – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Parents Need to Know After the Accident – has chapters on Automobile Accidents, Bicycle Accidents, Pedestrian Accidents, Wrongful Death, and other topics. You can get this book for free at When the Wheels Stop Spinning

Vehicle - Red Van - Child Safety.001When the outside temperature gets into the triple digits (100 degrees plus), it is clear that a child left in a “hot car” is at risk for serious medical problems and complications.  Even temperature lower than the triple digits can lead to serious permanent injuries,  it can only take a matter of minutes for the heat in a vehicle to get to a level that can put a child at risk for dehydration, hypothermia, and other complications.  We live in a fast paced world filled with distractions and tasks that keep us busy all day long.  In the hustle and bustle of the world that we live in, a child can be left behind in a hot vehicle, bus, or van by a parent, family member, family friend, day care center, summer camp, or school.   It is clear that 5 minutes of running into a store can turn into 15 minutes if you take a call or see a friend.  These minutes can be crucial to saving a life.  The better practice is to never leave a child unattended in a vehicle.
Here are some points to keep in mind:
*44 children died in hot cars in 2013;
*31 children died in hot cars in 2014;
*8 children (so far) died in hot cars in 2015;  and
*On even an 80 degree day – a child’s body temperature can reach fatal levels in a matter of minutes if left in a “hot car”.
Dr. Paul McPherson, a physician at St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital in Idaho, said children’s bodies absorb heat three to five times faster than adults and don’t disperse it as quickly.  See Heat Wave Dangers to Children Left in Hot Cars. 
This explains the days in which an adult seems to be sweating up a storm while the child does not seem to be sweating or hot at all.   Adults and child care providers should not judge the heat of the day or the environment by how the adult or child care provider feels.
The book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know – has chapters on Automobile Accidents, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries, and other topics. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury. 

gorgeous swimming pool side with colorful water mattress

Swimming Pool Drowings

Children are at risk for drowning incidents any time that children are near or in a swimming pool area or similar area like a lake, pond, water park, etc. . . .  As for residential swimming pools, it is important that pool owner and supervising adults keep a swimming pool out of the reach of children.  Certainly, a swimming pool owner, child care provider, and others watching child should following the applicable state and local laws; however, merely following the law will not prevent some incidents from happening.  There really is not substitute for common sense, supervision, or due diligence.

Florida enacted Chapter 515 – Residential Swimming Pool Safety Act as a measure to protect children. Pursuant to Section 515.29, Florida Statutes, a residential pool owner must comply with the following requirements:
515.29 Residential swimming pool barrier requirements.—

(1) A residential swimming pool barrier must have all of the following characteristics:
(a) The barrier must be at least 4 feet high on the outside.
(b) The barrier may not have any gaps, openings, indentations, protrusions, or structural components that could allow a young child to crawl under, squeeze through, or climb over the barrier.
(c) The barrier must be placed around the perimeter of the pool and must be separate from any fence, wall, or other enclosure surrounding the yard unless the fence, wall, or other enclosure or portion thereof is situated on the perimeter of the pool, is being used as part of the barrier, and meets the barrier requirements of this section.
(d) The barrier must be placed sufficiently away from the water’s edge to prevent a young child or medically frail elderly person who may have managed to penetrate the barrier from immediately falling into the water.
(2) The structure of an aboveground swimming pool may be used as its barrier or the barrier for such a pool may be mounted on top of its structure; however, such structure or separately mounted barrier must meet all barrier requirements of this section. In addition, any ladder or steps that are the means of access to an aboveground pool must be capable of being secured, locked, or removed to prevent access or must be surrounded by a barrier that meets the requirements of this section.
(3) Gates that provide access to swimming pools must open outward away from the pool and be self-closing and equipped with a self-latching locking device, the release mechanism of which must be located on the pool side of the gate and so placed that it cannot be reached by a young child over the top or through any opening or gap.
(4) A wall of a dwelling may serve as part of the barrier if it does not contain any door or window that opens to provide access to the swimming pool.
(5) A barrier may not be located in a way that allows any permanent structure, equipment, or similar object to be used for climbing the barrier.
A fence / barrier can prevent many drowning incidents from taking place; however, it should be noted that some children find ways under, over, and through fences because the lure of the water is so great. Small children lack safety awareness and good judgment.  Small children do not understand the dangers and risks of being around or in a swimming pool without proper adult supervision.  It just seems like play time for a child.  Unfortunately, children continue to drown in Florida pools.  A recent incident was reported in Lehigh Acres (Lee County) Florida. It was reported by the Gainesville Sun and other news outlets that a 4 year old boy drowned in a Southwest Florida swimming pool.  Law enforcement officials reported that the child used a lawn chair to climb over the pool fence.  The news report just contained a few details.  When a child dies unexpectedly, an autopsy is typically performed to see if there is another explanation for the cause and manner of death other than the drowning incident.  See Four Year Old Drowns in Southwest Florida Swimming Pool.
If a child dies from a drowning related incident at a day care center, summer camp, neighbor’s house, or even a relative’s house, there may be a cause of action to pursue even if there was a pool fence in place at the time of the incident.   It should be pointed out that under Florida law – a child under the age of 6 years old cannot be held negligent for his or her own actions.  Florida law recognizes that children in this age range do not have the ability to properly understand dangers OR act in a reasonably safe manner.  For children 6 years and older, the facts and circumstances must be evaluated to determine if there is a viable case or cause of action to pursue.  For instance, a case on behalf of a 7 year old is evaluated must differently than that of a 17 year old. 
The book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know – has chapters on Swimming Pool and Water Park Injuries, Theme Park and Attraction Injuries, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries and other topics. You can get this book for free at  The ABCs of Child Injury.

medical_1000006509-120613intIn Florida, a child under the age of 6 years old cannot be held liable for his or her own negligence or carelessness.  This is the law in the State of Florida.  Why is this particular law in place?  The policy reasons behind this law is based on the known fact that young children lack safety awareness and lack good judgment especially when near something interesting or fun in appearance like a body of water, pool, playground, etc . . . .
Let’s take an example.  Let’s say that a 5 year old child is enrolled in a day care center.   The child walks into an unlocked janitor / cleaning supply closet.  While in the closet, the child sees some brightly colored blue jug.  The child opens the jugs and pours the chemicals over his or her head.  The child then sustains significant and painful burns that require an extended hospitalization and result in lifelong and permanent scarring to the face.  This is certainly a tragic incident; however it is an incident that is foreseeable and preventable.   The door should have been locked and all dangerous chemicals should have been kept out of the reach of the child. Furthermore, with constant and consistent supervision, the child would have been re-directed or kept from the area of danger.   This 5 year old child was injured due to a lack of supervision. The child cannot be faulted for his actions because he was under the age of 6 years old at the time of the incident.
For children 6 and older, a portion of the fault can be attributed to the child; however, the age and maturity of the child are considered for children 6 and older.  If the same incident happened with a 6 year old, it would be my opinion that all of the fault for this particular incident would still fall upon the Florida Day Care Center which failed to properly supervise this child.
Of course, the aforementioned incident involving chemical burns to a child is just one of many incidents that can happen at a Florida Day Care Center when there is a lack of proper safety precautions and supervision.   Here is another example of what can happen to a child when there is a lack of proper supervision.  It was reported that a child was injured when he was climbing and jumping over a fence during play time.  He attempted to climb and jump the fence to retrieve a ball. As he was getting over the top of the fence, his fan was caught on one of the metal spikes and he suffered a serious injury to the hand. You can read more about this particular incident at Child Suffers Injury Due to Fence at School – Plastic Surgery and Other Medical Care Needed. 
If a child is injured as a result of a lack of supervision even if the child put himself or herself in danger, a case or claim can still be pursued.  Due to the intricacies of Florida law and the challenges to most injury cases, a parent should contact a Florida Child Injury Attorney for advice, consultation, guidance, and legal representation.
The book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – has chapters on School Injuries, Day Care Center Injuries, Theme Park and Attraction Injuries,  Homeonwers’ s Insurance, Shopping Center Injuries,  and other topics.  You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury. 

Florida Day Care Center Book.001In Florida day care centers as well as day care centers throughout the nation, there is a common risk present no matter the size or type of day care centers.   This is the risk of choking on small objects.   It is well known that children are curious. Furthermore, children have poor safety awareness especially when it comes to putting objects in the mouth like toy parts, household items, and coins.  Furthermore, some foods are notoriously dangerous to toddlers and infants like hot dogs, grapes, hard vegetables and fruits, and other items.  Because of the known risks of chocking, day care centers have a duty and responsibility to keep all hazardous items away from the reach of children.   It is acceptable for a day care center to keep change / coins not he premises but it is quite another thing if the coins are within the reach of children.  It is certainly quite worse even if the children (toddlers and infants) are given coins or other small objects to play with.   One coin or small hard object can lead to a choking incident which, in turn, can cause serious personal injuries, brain injuries, and even death.
Let’s take a look at another example.  A 2 year old is playing with legos in the day care center. The lego set is recommended for children 4 and older.   There are a number of small pieces that the child has access to in the lego box.   The child puts one of the small pieces in his mouth and chokes on the object.  Fire rescue is called and the child is rushed to the hospital.  The child is in ICU for 10 days.  The child ultimately recovered from the incident but only have 6 months of treatment and care.   The whole incident and resulting damages and harm could have been avoided with better supervision and with the removal of the dangerous items from the reach of this 2 year old child. 
The book – Florida Day Care Center Injuries – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – Building Blocks of Knowledge for Parents – has sections on Supervision, Incident Reports, Emergency Procedures, Indoor Facilities, Outdoor Facilities, and other topics. You can get this book for free at Florida Day Care Center Injuries.  

Play Time Written In Multicolored Plastic Kids Letters

Play Time at Day Care Centers, Schools, and Summer Camp

At most playgrounds, it is common to see a slide.  Children often enjoy playing on playgrounds and especially the joy and thrill of climbing up a slide and then sliding down.  If the slide is age appropriate and used correctly, most injuries from playground slides are avoided.   This also assumes that there is sufficient and reasonable supervision in place for all of the children on the playground including but not limited to the slide area – ladder, levels, slide, and landing.  Unfortunately, for some children, the playground slide is the location of a serious personal injury.   When a child is injured on a playground, the day care center, summer camp, property owner, school, or city / county entity may be liable for the resulting injuries and damages.   The liability or responsibility will depend on the ability to prove the four essential elements of a civil case or claim:

1. Duty;
2. Breach of Duty;
3. Causation; and
4. Damages.
Here are a couple of examples which could form the basis of a case in establishing each of the above elements.
Larger / Older Child or Adult Slides Down Slide with Child
One very dangerous thing to do is to slide down a slide with a child.   This can lead to serious injuries including but not limited to leg fractures.  If the rubber from the child’s shoe gets stuck on the slide on the way down, the weight of the adult or older child may, in turn, cause the leg to fracture.  If the child is too young or small to go down the slide on his or her own, it is advisable to avoid the slide for that child.  This same child may also lack the motor skills and judgment to be able to safety climb the stairs and / or platforms to get to the slide.
Child Suffers Burn Injuries from Use of Slide on a Hot Day
The child care providers should inspect all equipment prior to use.  The property owners should also use the best efforts to only place safe equipment on the playground.  If the equipment like the slide is prone to get hot on a frequent basis in which it caused burn injuries, the slide in question may need to be replaced or just simply removed.  Burn injuries are avoided with better equipment selection and installation OR with better supervision.
Child Slides Down Head First on the Slide
Here is another example in which the school, summer camp, or day care center can be held liable.  It is the duty and responsibility to provide supervision on the playground to make sure that the children properly use the equipment. It is well known that children lack good judgment.  As such, child care providers should be diligent while watching the children and make sure that any dangerous activities or use are prohibited and dealt with in a timely fashion.  Rules should be made clear to all of the children.  Any child disobeying the rules should be removed from the playground immediately in order to make the point clear to the other children that unsafe play or actions will not be tolerated.
The above are just a few examples.  It should be noted and emphasized that each potential case should be evaluated on its own facts and merits.  In some instances, the injury is unfortunate but not necessarily actionable.  Again, it will depend on the particular facts that led to the injury.
The book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know – has chapters on Playground Injuries, Day Care Center Injuries, School Injuries, and other topics. You can get his book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.