What are the Dangers of Summer for Kids? Safety Tips and Legal Rights

Summer-150x150During the summer months, children get a break from school and and are able to the enjoy the outdoors, swimming, sports, summer camp, and other activities.  With these activities, there are risks. Children, especially toddlers and infants, lack basic safety awareness.  Elementary school aged children, pre-teens, and even teens do not always recognize the danger of certain activities and situation.  As such, it is important for adults, caregivers, counselors, teachers, and others responsible for the care and supervision of children to be mindful of the risks for many summer activities.  When a child is injured, the most important thing to do is to get the child out of harm’s way and then address the medical needs of a child.  When a child is injured due to the negligence of others, there may be a legal remedy and right to compensation for the injured child.  While the pursuit of justice and the enforcement of legal rights are important concepts, it is also important to exercise due care and supervision to begin with so that injuries are avoided. With summer activities, the safety of the child is paramount to other concerns and issues.

In the summer, children will often go swimming. Because of this, pool safety should be the priority for parents, caregivers, teachers, counselorse, and pool owners. More than 1,000 children each year die from drowning and countless others suffer life-altering injuries. The majority of drowning accidents happen in home swimming pools. Of these drownings, most of these could have been prevented had a gate been installed around the pool. Pool gates should be at least four feet tall and be out of the reach of a small child. If your child is swimming, you should be in the pool with them, or supervising from a close distance. Supervision should involve having your eyes on the phone and the child rather than your eyes on a mobile phone, TV, or tablet.

Another potential danger to children this summer is a treehouse. Almost 3,000 children are sent to the hospital every year for treehouse related injuries; anywhere from bumps and bruises to cuts from broken glass and strangulation from rope. Due to the number of risks, a parent should take special care when constructing and allowing a child to play in a treehouse. They should build it low to the ground, no higher than ten feet. The treehouse needs solid barrier walls. And, if children are playing in the treehouse, they should be supervised.

One major threat to a child’s safety this summer is something that some parents might overlook—the lawnmower. Annually, over 17,000 children are injured by lawnmowers; more than 600 of these resulted in an amputation and 75 were fatal. A lawnmower related accident is easy to prevent. Children shouldn’t be allowed to play near a running lawnmower nor should they be allowed to play on or with a lawnmower, even if it’s not running. If you’re operating a riding lawnmower, don’t let your child ride it with you. In short, if kids are out while a lawnmower is running, there’s a risk.

Attorney David Wolf is a child injury attorney and a child safety advocate based in Jacksonville, Florida. He handles child injury and personal injury cases throughout the State of Florida. He is the author of 12 books including the book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know. You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.  David Wolf provides a Free Consultation on all child injury and personal injury cases.