Articles Tagged with drownings

Summer-Pool-Time-150x150Summer is filled with fun, games, and outdoor activities.  Children get a break from school and the time to enjoy the outdoors.  While summer can be filled with wonderful activities and fun, it also is filled with risks and dangers.  This is especially true for any and all activities in or near water. Children, especially toddlers and infants, do not understand the risks / dangers associated with swimming pools and other aquatic areas.  While the risks of drowning are well known or should be well known to adults / child care providers, there are still reported drownings of children every year.

For children one to four years old, drowning is statistically the most likely cause of death, but there are ways in which it can be avoided. Unattended bodies of water such as bathtubs, ponds, and pools serve as the biggest threat to your child’s safety. According to KidsHealth.org it takes less than 2 inches of water for a young child to drown, meaning any small bodies of water whether it be in a sink or toilet could pose risks to a child’s safety. Unsupervised access to these bodies of water could quickly lead to a drowning case in which it only takes 90 seconds for your child to potentially pass away. The National Safety Council recommends that parents give their children swim lessons from an early age in order to teach them how to swim and further prevent a possible drowning incident.

From the perspective of a community center or any organization tasked with watching children near bodies of water, supervision is of the utmost importance. Having at least one designated “water watcher” lowers the chances of unexpected drowning instances. In cases pertaining to community pools there may be a lifeguard watching the water but it is always safe to assign at least one additional “water watcher” in order to account for moments in which the lifeguard may not be paying attention OR otherwise occupied with another situation. When a drowning or potential drowning incidnt occurs, there is very little time to react and potentially save a life. Ensure that employees and parents are aware of CPR techniques as this knowledge and skill may be the difference between life and death in these occurrences. Around larger bodies of water, such as lakes, rivers, and oceans, ensure that all children are fashioned with life jackets, even if they are adequate swimmers. Life jackets could also be used in smaller bodies of water for weaker swimmers. When at these natural bodies of water also be aware of local wildlife and foliage that could potentially cause a drowning incident. Large waves and undertows are also known causes of drowning so be sure to keep children away from these parts of the water. Teaching children to not stand with their back to waves can lower the odds of them being knocked over and into the water. Safety first should be top of mind in any situation where a child is in or near a water area.

Swimming Pool - Water Slide - Injury - Drowning
During the summer months, children enjoy the time off from school and the opportunity to splash around at the community pool, a neighbor’s pool, a water park, or theme park.  Most public areas are well maintained and inspected frequently.  Most are staffed with trained lifeguards and maintenance personnel to provide for a safe aquatic environment for children. Unfortunately for some children Unfortunately for some children during the summer months, a swimming pool, water park, or theme park is the site for a serious personal injury.  Some incidents even result in the untimely and tragic death of a child as a result of a drowning or a traumatic injury.
Is a water park, theme park or property owner of a swimming pool liable or responsible for injuries that take place on the premises? The answer to this question like many other depends the particular facts and circumstances of the incident leading to the serious personal injuries or death of the child. There are four elements that are required to be proved to establish a case against a swimming pool owner, theme park, or water park.
1. Duty;