Articles Posted in Day Camps / Summer Camps

https://www.floridachildinjurylawyer.com/files/2017/08/Day-Care-Center-Hot-Van.001-150x150.jpegIn Florida and other warm weather States, the same tragic story seems to be reported every Spring and Summer.  A child is left by a day care center in a van or bus and dies as a result of hyperthermia.  The name of the child is different but the story seems to be the same.  The child was forgotten in the van or bus because roll call was not properly taken and double checked. These “Hot Car” or “Hot Van” deaths are among the easiest to prevent.  It does not require the investment of millions, thousands, or even hundreds of dollars to prevent.  It only requires a pen, paper, and the attentiveness of one staff member to prevent these deaths from taking place.  While it may be tedious to check and double check when children get on and off of a day care center or school bus – the mundane and tedious work is well worth the fact that the lives of children can be saved with this due diligence.  The fact is the we live in a world of distractions and multiple responsibilities on the part of day care centers and child care centers.  However, the fact that there are distractions and multiple responsibilities are never ever an excuse or defense to leaving a child alone in a hot van, car, or school bus.
A recent death of a 3 year old child in the Orlando area is yet one of many deaths reported when roll call or a head count was not properly completed.  When the temperature outside is in the 80s or 90s, the temperature inside in the vehicle can be 40 to 50 degrees or even hotter inside the vehicle.   In just a few minutes, a small child can go from healthy to dead when left alone and unattended in a hot day care center van, bus, or vehicle.  It was reported that Myles Hill, a 3 year old girl, was left on a day care center vehicle operated by Little Miracles Academy.  Following the death of the child, criminal charges were filed in the form of aggravated manslaughter by the State Attorney’s office.  You can read more about this topic at  3 Year Old Child Dies in Orlando Florida – Day Care Center Hot Van Death. 
When a child dies as a result of the negligence of a day care center, child care provider, summer camp, school, or other third party, the parents can file a wrongful death case against the responsible party, individual, and business.  In Florida, wrongful death cases are governed by both case law and statutes as set forth in Florida Statutes Chapter 768.

Building-Blocks-A-and-D-Day-Care-Center-Injuires-150x150Parents rely on others to provide child care during the work day, nights, and vacations as needed. Most child care providers do an excellent job in supervising the children in a safe and nurturing environment.  There are some child care providers who lack the patience, training, and common sense to provide quality care.  Parents should carefully choose the child care providers.  However, in some instances, parents have limited resources and choices and go with what is available, close, or convenient.  When a child care provider is negligent or careless, a case or claim can be brought against the child care provider.

As a Child Injury Lawyer, there are many factors to consider when evaluating a potential case against a child care provider for injuries to the child.  One important practical factor involves the available liability insurance and resources in place to compensate the injured child.  For instance, let’s day that a child is cared for in a family day care setting with three other children.   The day care center is not licensed and does not carry any liability insurance.  The owner of the day care center essentially lives “paycheck-to-paycheck” and has no assets to speak of.  While a 5 year old was under the care of the facility, he wandered into a closet with some chemicals and cleaners.  He mistakenly knocked over one of the bottles and suffered some rather serious burns to his hands.  Once the day care center found the child, 911 was called and the child was transported to a local emergency room.
Would this be a case of negligence that could be pursued against the owner of the day care center?  The answer to this excellent question is both “Yes” and “No”.  Well, that is a confusing answer.  There certainly would be a “legal” case to pursue against the day care center owner.   The four essential elements of a day care center case could be established:  Duty, Breach of Duty, Causation, and Damages.  The chemicals and cleaners should have been locked up and kept out of the reach of the 5 year old child.  The day care center owner breached the duty to provide a safe environment for the child.  As a result of the breach of duty, the child was injured and suffered damages.  As such, it appears that the four elements of a “legal” case could be established; however, the case would most likely be hampered by the fact that the day care center owner has not assets or money to pay for a settlement or judgment associated with the personal injuries.  As such, from a “practical” standpoint, the case probably would not be pursued by most personal injury attorneys who should perform a “legal” and “practical” evaluation of the potential case.

Toy-Graphics-from-Free-Pik-copy-150x150In the State of Florida, the Department of Children and Families licenses, inspects, and otherwise regulates day care centers and child care facilities.   Inspections, training, staff to child ratios, and other aspects of the facility and child care operation must comfort with the applicable Florida laws and regulations related to child care centers or day care centers.  As a Florida Child Injury Lawyer, I am periodically asked what regulations apply to baby sitting or child care services provided at gyms and fitness centers.  Under Florida law and in particular Section 402.302 (2) – Definition – Child Care Facilities, a “child care facility” is defined as center or arrangement to provide care for more than five children in which the facility or center receives a fee or grant for payment for providing child care.
While one may think that any commercial establishment that provides care or supervision of children should be subject to regulations, licensure, and child care training and courses.  Unfortunately, gyms, fitness centers, and similar facilities that provide some form of child care or babysitting do not qualify as “child care centers” and as such do not require licensure, regulation, or oversight.  It is a bit frightening to conceptualize that babysitting and child care centers in gyms and fitness centers are not subject to the same rules as day care centers and child care centers that receive payment for these particular services.
Since licensure for a day care center is not required for child care as part of a gym or fitness facility, does this mean that the gym or fitness center avoids liability or responsibility when there is an injury to a child?  The answer to this question is “Absolutely Not.”  A gym or fitness center can be help liable if the gym or fitness center is determined to be negligent in fulfilling it duties sand responsibilities to provide a reasonably safe environment for children under the care of the business establishment.  To prove up a case, there must be evidence as to four elements of the case:

https://www.floridachildinjurylawyer.com/files/2017/07/Red-Vehicle.001-150x150.jpegIn the State of Florida, it is a crime to leave a child unattended in a vehicle that is turned off.  Pursuant to Section 316.6135, Florida Statutes, it is a misdemeanor to leave a child unattended in a vehicle for more than 15 minutes.  It is a felony if the child suffers significant bodily harm, permanent injury, or disfigurement as a result of being left unattended in the vehicle.  It is also a misdemeanor leaving a child unattended in a vehicle that is still running if the health of the child is put at risk OR the child appears to be in distress. 

The statute as it currently reads is a bit troublesome in that a child can suffer serious personal injuries or even death by being left in a hot car or day care center van in less than 15 minutes.  Some lawmakers in the State of Florida are pushing for changes to this legislation / Florida law to better protect children and to serve as a reminder to parents, guardians, caregivers, and day care centers to stop putting children at risk by leaving children in a vehicle.  

David Wolf – Personal Injury Attorney – is based in Jacksonville, Florida and handles child injury, automobile accident, day care center, and related cases throughout the State of Florida.  He is the author of 11 books including the book titled The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – What Every Parent Should Know and the book titled Florida Day Care Center Injuries – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – Building Blocks of Knowledge for Parents. You can get these books for free by visiting the Personal Injury Book Section of the Wood, Atter & Wolf, P.A. Law Firm Website. 

Drowning-Prevention-Tips-150x150In the summer throughout the United States, there is a common risk in just about every neighborhood – the risk of drowning.  It is important that all child care providers including babysitters, day care centers, child care centers, schools, and summer camps have a plan in place for the proper supervision of children any time that there is a swimming pool accessible to the child and anytime that there are aquatic or boating related activities.

David Wolf is a personal injury attorney based in Jacksonville, Florida who handles child injury cases throughout the State of Florida.  David Wolf is an attorney, author, and advocate for the safety of children.  It is important that the safety of a child be a top of the mind priority for a child care provider any time a child is near a swimming pool or some how may gain access to a swimming pool.  David Wolf is the author of 11 books including the book titled – The ABCs of Child Injury – Legal Rights of the Injured Child. This book covers a variety of topics including the following:  Swimming Pools, Water Parks and Other Bodies of Water, Sports and Recreational Injuries, Automobile Accidents, Playground Injuries, and other topics.  You can get this book for free at The ABCs of Child Injury.

Drowning is more common than we would like to admit, in fact, for children between the ages of one and fourteen it is the second leading cause of death. Because of the increased risk these children face, it is important for parents, neighbors, friends, relatives, schools, summer camps, day care centers and all others in charge of supervising a child in or near a swimming pool or other water way to keep the certain tips and concepts in mind.

4_ToysIn Florida and other States, day care centers should essentially be safe havens for children. Hard working parents deserve the comfort and peace of mind knowing that a child is safe and protected in a day care center. Unfortunately, far too many children are injured in the very places (day care centers / child care centers) where the children should be otherwise in a safe learning environment. In the aftermath of a child injury at a Florida day care center, a parent is faced with many questions, challenges, and stresses. It is at this time that a Florid Child Injury Lawyer can provide some help, guidance, advice, and, when necessary, legal representation. David Wolf has over 26 years of experience. From this first day on the job as an attorney to the present day, he has spent the duration of his entire legal career to the protection and enforcement of the legal rights of children. He is the author of a number of books including the book titled – Florida Day Care Center Injuries – Legal Rights of the Injured Child – Building Blocks of Knowledge for Parents. This book has chapters on Indoor Facilities, Outdoor Facilities, Playgrounds, Staffing, Emergency Procedures, Incident Reports, and other topics. You can get this book for free at Florida Day Care Center Injuries.

When evaluating a potential day care center case, there are four elements to establish:

1 – Duty;

Stroller - Child Safety - Personal Injury
During the summer and other months in warm weather States, children are at risk for heat related illnesses including by not limited to hyperthermia.  It is important that summer camps, schools, day care centers, and other child care providers understand that children respond and handle the heat much differently than adults.  Furthermore, a child does not necessary verbalize or even recognize himself or herself when there is a risk of serious complications from the heat. This is especially true for infants, toddlers, and special needs children who are not communicative.   According to Dr.  Ross Tobleman, an emergency medical director based in Texas, “Little children can certainly get into trouble very quickly without having us recognize the signs that they’re getting trouble.”  This is a reference to heat and medical complications.   It should be noted that the metabolism and body of a child works much differently than that of an adult.  You can read more about this topic at Heat Related Illnesses Harder to Detect in Children.

In this article, it is interesting to note that strollers and other confined spaces can present a real risk of danger, medical complication, and even death to children in the heat of summer and other months.   Since children do not sweat or control body temperature the same as an adult, a glance at a child may lead a child care provider to believe that all is well because the child is not sweating profusely or appear to be that hot or overexposed to the heat.  The truth is that child care provides, on many occasions, do not and cannot see that a child is truly a risk and approaching a critical overexposure to the heat.   Some times, it is only the child’s outward signs of trauma, arrest, or other significant issues that finally alerts the child care provider that there is a problem.

In Florida, child care providers, summer camps, day care centers, schools and other entities have a duty to keep a child out of harm’s way.  One known risk is the Florida heat.  Make sure that a child – especially infants and toddlers – are provided with proper ventilation when in confined spaces like a stroller. Furthermore, as we have seen far too many times, a child should not be left unattended on a school bus or school van without air conditioning.   Let’s make sure that this point is clear.   A child needs to be supervised at all times and should never be left on a bus or van alone – air conditioned or without air conditioning.

Kids Block Spelling Dad As Symbol for Fatherhood And ParentingOne basic duty of every day care center is to supervise the children to make sure that the children do not wander out of the facility and into harm’s way.  The fact is that most day care centers are located on or near a busy road or expressway.   The busy roads are dangerous.  The parking lots are also dangerous to children especially toddlers who have very poor safety awareness.  Keeping a child safe should be a priority for every day care center.  Unfortunately, some day care centers are not so diligent with the supervision of the children.  Doors are left open, facilities are not kept in good repair, and most importantly supervision is lax.  Many day care centers put profits or income over the safety and supervision of the children.  Many hire low paying personnel with little or no training.  Furthermore, many such day care center workers are not motivated to put in a hard day’s work and do as little as possible just to get through the day and to the next paycheck. Of course, there are many hard working child care providers out there who work diligently to keep children safe and well supervised during the day.
When a child wanders out of a day care facility, the consequences can be disastrous and even deadly.  What if a chid wanders away from a day care center?  Can the center be sued?  These are common but excellent questions. There are four basic elements to bring forth a legal case or lawsuit against a day care center.
1. Duty;

Very High Scorching Temperature Shown On A Big Thermostat

Hot Cars – Risks to Children

In Florida and other states, the heat during the summer months as well as other times of the year present a constant danger to children being transported by day care centers, summer camp, schools, parents, relatives, and friends.  It is vital that children are removed from a vehicle when the destination is reached.  A quick run in to the dry cleaners, school, convenience store, and other locations can result in serious personal injuries and even death to a child left behind.   For this article, the focus is heat related complications and illnesses; however, a child, who is left alone, in a vehicle can choke on small object, get his or her head caught in a power windows, become entangled or even strangulated by a seat belt, mobile phone wire, or other object, and otherwise get injured or harmed in other ways.  It is important that all hazards are removed form the vehicle and that a child is never – ever left unattended in a vehicle.   The safety of the child should always take priority over the convenience of the driver or adult supervisors.   In this day and age, we just have too many distractions in place that take our attention away from what is the most important job at hand – the proper supervision of children.   Here are some tips to keep in mind and use when transporting children.  Following these and other safety measures can save a child from the harm or injury associated with heat exposure.

*Never ever leave a child unattended in a vehicle;

First Aid Kit - Child InjuryOver the summer and other times of year, children can spend hours of time enjoying the fun and activity in a bounce house.   It should be noted that with any bounce house activity or similar activity – a child could suffer injuries through no fault of the property owner, management company, or owner / renter of the bounce house.  Injuries happen; however, it should also be noted that many bounce house related activities result from a lack of proper set up and / or a lack of proper adult supervision. Let’s discuss an example.  Let’s say a homeowner rents a bounce house.  The homeowner’s four year old and his friend (also 4 years old) are playing in the bounce house.  The homeowner decides to leave the children alone to cook a meal and check on some e-mails.  While the boys are outside in the bounce house, another child, who is 12 years old and much larger than the other children, visits the home and bounces in the bounce house with the 4 year old boys.   The 12 year old is doing a back flip and lands on the 4 year old child who was visiting the home.   The boy suffers a fractured leg and is treated at a local emergency room and later by an orthopedic surgeon.   Under this general fact scenario, there would be a case or claim to pursue against the homeowner for failure to supervise the children.  Had the homeowner been properly supervising the bounce house area, the 12 year old would be been kept out of the bounce house until the 4 year old boys needed a break and then the 12 year old boy – who had visited the home on many occasions and was a friend of the family – could have safely used the bounce house on his owner.   Like other personal injury cases, there are essentially four elements to establish a claim or case against a homeowner for negligence:
1. Duty;
 
2. Breach of Duty;